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Whether you’re preparing legal documents or resolving a serious dispute, our attorneys offer the reliable and practical counsel you need to get results.

Over 100 Years Of Combined Experience

Understanding Medicaid eligibility for long-term care benefits

On Behalf of | Aug 12, 2022 | Elder Law

When planning for the future, you should consider the potential costs of long-term care, such as an assisted living facility or in-home care. Having the necessary resources to meet your needs is essential, especially if you have a medical condition that may require specialized care as you age.

Many Texans rely on Medicaid to help cover the cost of long-term care when Medicare or other insurance runs out. Understanding the requirements and restrictions for eligibility can help you when you are preparing to apply for Medicaid.

Citizenship and Residency

To qualify for Medicaid benefits, you must be a U.S. citizen or a legal immigrant. In addition to citizenship, you may also need to provide proof of state residency.

Age and disability

To receive Medicaid to pay for long-term care, you need to prove that you require the level of assistance provided by in-home care for an assisted living facility. You can apply for Medicaid if you are over 65, blind, or disabled. You must also demonstrate a medical necessity for extended care.

Income and asset limits

Even if you meet your state’s eligibility requirements for citizenship, residency, and medical necessity, you can only receive Medicaid benefits if your assets and income are below a certain amount. This amount can vary if you have a spouse or reside in certain states.

Medicaid provides vital resources to help you pay for necessary long-term care, but the eligibility requirements and resource caps vary from state to state. Understanding how the law works can help you protect your assets while you plan for your future needs.